Tuesday, 30 December 2014 00:00

Hester Davis - Dec 30 2014

Hester Davis passed away this morning.  More to follow.

Hester was a keystone in building the program at Arkansas where I eventually got my masters and where ShovelBums was born. It's a small field and we are interconnected in myriads ways.  Never forget that. We all impact each other at some point. Make your impact positive for those who follow like Hester did.

  

Hester Davis

 

Hester A. Davis holds has two M.A. degrees—one in Social and Technical Assistance from Haverford College in Pennsylvania, and one in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. In 1959 she accepted a position with the University of Arkansas Museum, where she served first as Preparator and then as Assistant Director. In 1967, with the creation of the Arkansas Archeological Survey, she was appointed State Archeologist, a position in which she served until her retirement in 1999. She also taught in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Arkansas, creating and teaching a course in Public Archaeology for 10 years. She retired as a full professor. She has served as a board member or officer of the Society for American Archaeology, Register of Professional Archaeologists, Archaeological Institute of America, and U.S. National Committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites, among others. She recently authored Remembering Awatovi: The Story of an Archaeological Expedition in Northern Arizona, 1935–1939 (2008). http://www.archaeologysouthwest.org/who-we-are/boards/advisory-board/advisory-board-member-hester-a-davis/


From the Arkansas Archaeological Survey

History of the State Archeologist

The position of State Archeologist was created as part of the legislation establishing the Arkansas Archeological Survey in 1967, and Hester A. Davis was appointed to the position.

As there was no job description in the bill, the duties and responsibilities of the position grew and changed as the Survey grew and changed, and as experience dictated. Early on, a division of labor was established between the Director of the Survey and the State Archeologist. The Director handled fiscal matters, contact with University administration and the state legislature, personnel and policy matters, and administration of the Sponsored Research Program and Computer Services Program. 

The State Archeologist handled administration of the Survey Coordinating Office, Research Stations, and Registrar's Office, and served as editor of the Survey publications program. 

The State Archeologist also worked closely with the Arkansas Archeological Society, directing the development of the Training Program for Amateur Archeologists, and serving as editor and treasurer for the Society. On the national scene, the State Archeologist was involved in the development and promotion of public archeology, through work on federal legislation and participation in professional societies and conferences.

From about 1972 to 1987, the State Archeologist acted as the archeological review-and-compliance person for the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO), reviewing federal projects and reports resulting from archeological work under contract. In 1987, with the hiring of an archeologist to handle compliance work in the SHPO office, this function was transferred to Little Rock.

In June 1999, Hester Davis retired as State Archeologist. The position will continue to grow and evolve under the second and current State Archeologist, Dr. Ann M. Early.


A great interview with Hester:

http://www.nps.gov/CRMjournal/Summer2009/interview.html

Interview

An Interview with Hester Davis (Barbara J. Little (BJL), CRM Journal Editor, interviewed Davis on April 24, 2009.)

by Barbara J. Little

Hester Davis

 

Hester A. Davis has served as a board member or officer of the Society for American Archaeology, Register of Professional Archaeologists, Archaeological Institute of America, Southeastern Archeological Conference, Southeastern Museums Conference, and U.S. National Committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites. In the 1980s she served as Coordinator of the Coordinating Council of National Archeological Societies. She served on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chief's Environmental Advisory Board from 1988 to 1991. She was appointed by President Clinton to the Cultural Property Advisory Committee on which she served for seven years. From 1969-2000 she was a member of the Arkansas State Review Board on Historic Preservation (appointed by Governors Rockefeller, Bumpers, Pryor, Clinton, White, Clinton, and Tucker).

In 1959 she accepted a position with the University of Arkansas Museum, where she served first as Preparator and then as Assistant Director. In 1967, with the creation of the Arkansas Archeological Survey, she was appointed State Archeologist, a position in which she served until her retirement in 1999. She also taught in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Arkansas, among other things creating and teaching a course in Public Archaeology for 10 years. She retired as a full professor. She holds two Masters of Arts degrees, one in Social and Technical Assistance from Haverford College in Pennsylvania and one in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in History from Rollins College (Florida), which also awarded her a Doctor of Humane Letters in 1987. Lyon College (in Arkansas) also awarded her a Doctor of Humane Letters, upon her retirement.

BJL: Tell us how you became interested in being an archeologist. What experiences and individuals influenced your career choice?

HAD: I don't remember thinking about and making a decision about a career. I followed some opportunities as they drifted by.  Read More...

Last modified on Tuesday, 24 February 2015 21:38
 
 
Real time web analytics, Heat map tracking